A Catholic Scientist Proves God Exists

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Challenging today's accepted “wisdom,” Catholic scientist Gerard Verschuuren, Ph.D., here demonstrates that the question of whether God exists is not one science can answer. Indeed, that would be like expecting a microscope to reveal the square root of sixteen!

Verschuuren begins by explaining the five famous medieval proofs for the existence of God — based on reason alone — that have survived despite nearly a thousand years of efforts to refute them. With his wise help, you'll come to see that just as reason gives us access to the existence of numbers, so it is reason that gives us access to the existence of God. In fact, when we use our reason to investigate the existence of God, we encounter proofs that are more powerful, by far, than any that science could ever provide.

Yes, Verschuuren is a Catholic; but he's also a long-standing scientist, schooled in using reason alone to draw forth from evidence the proofs to which it necessarily leads. Among the many truths that Verschuuren evinces here by reason alone are the following:

  • Why science is not qualified to speak about the existence — or nonexistence — of God
  • The many ways we can know for certain that God exists
  • How we know that God is all-perfect
  • How God can be all-knowing
  • How we know He is all-powerful
  • What it means to say that He is “all-present”
  • Why the same God cannot be the God of all religions
  • And much more that reveals the enormous power of reason — and the even greater power of God!

Try it! Verschuuren's stunning proofs for God's existence — based on evidence alone — will open your eyes, stir your heart and, more importantly, deepen your faith in the wondrous Creator of Heaven and earth!

  • Pages:
  • Format(s): Paperback, eBook
  • ISBN: 978-1-64413-104-6
  • Product Code: 1046
  • Availability: In Stock
  • Publication Date: February 04, 2020
  • Categories: Apologetics, By Title, New Releases, Science and Faith
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A Must Read!
I very much enjoyed Gerard Verschuuren's book. His knowledge and faith can certainly create a book worth sharing. Any knowledge regarding God is crucial especially in these times. Ignorance is not bliss.
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My mother put us to bed with, “good night and God bless.” But such a conventional expression of God’s existence is no longer common—not only at the level of individual expression. In recent years, in an attempt not to be gauche or offensive, a major political party purged the name God from its party platform; while at the United Nations their Human Rights Council suggests their man-made rules should take precedence over world religions. So can our secular domain be ruled with a technocratic faith without running the risk of a dysfunctional society where “every man is opposed to every other man?” This is just one of the many such questions you will find pointers to in Verschuuren’s extremely readable book.
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Seeking God is the greatest adventure, and this book is an invaluable guide
A Catholic Scientist Proves God Exists by Dr. Gerard Verschuuren is a excellent, short and clear book that lives up to its title, and then some. Here are some brief excerpts: Apologetics: Proofs for the existence of God are highly certain, but they still have some significant uncertainty. The best we can say, paraphrasing Dobzhansky’s line, is this: nothing on earth makes sense except in the light of God’s existence. Religion: Reason is our most important tool to decide what is true and what is false. Religious beliefs that are against reason cannot be true; religious faith that is not open to reason cannot be true; religions that are irrational and incoherent cannot be true; contradictions between religions cannot be accepted. In fact, reason is the best, if not the only, criterion to judge a religion’s truth. Reason acts as a litmus test for religions. Religions based on extraterrestrial sources or on books that only some people are supposed to have access to or on books that no longer exist have a hard time passing the test of reason. As a consequence of this, we should never reduce “religion” to a mere set of beliefs and opinions, untested by reason. Once we abandon reason as a litmus test for religion, any belief could be called a religion Suffering: As a matter of fact, a life without challenge is a life without interest. Since our youth, we have been conditioned to view suffering as an impediment to happiness. We live in a world that turns away from suffering; our bathroom cabinets are filled with painkillers. Yet we could be missing out on another dimension of suffering, for suffering has the mysterious potential of redeeming us, transforming us, transfiguring us. Suffering can be very therapeutic. Whereas the Stoics say, “Suffering is nothing,” Christians say, “Suffering is everything.” [Doing good and fighting evil often requires suffering, and doing good and fighting evil is worth suffering for.] Universals: Concepts are universals: they abstract from particular observations that which is universal in them. Concepts have the universality that observations miss. Whereas material things are always particular, concepts are always universal. From this we may conclude that concepts, and the propositions that contain them, are abstract objects. Some people think concepts are just thoughts. Concepts cannot be mere thoughts. If concepts were just thought, then we could not communicate with each other. When we communicate, there must be something in common that transcends our private thoughts. That’s where concepts come in. A concept is not a thought - it’s only the object of a thought. Concepts do not come from thoughts, but they make thoughts possible. Concepts are not mere linguistic entities. Concepts are not definitions, because definitions require other concepts. Dictionaries, for instance, must ultimately always use circular references, since all words in a dictionary are defined in terms of other words. A dictionary can never step outside its confines to refer to something outside the dictionary. [Dictionaries use circular references. Human can understand dictionaries because humans have concepts in their minds which can be used to understand dictionaries.] Concepts do not come from just observing items because observations are always about particular things, whereas concepts are universal. Also, for certain concepts, there may be nothing to point at. To explain the concept of tomorrow, there is nothing to point at (other than a calendar, but that requires the concept of calendar as well). Neither does the mathematical concept of pi refer to any object in the world that we can point to. Concepts are not material because material things are always particular, whereas concepts are universal. Concepts are also not material because they don’t have any of the properties of matter, such as weight, shape or color. If concepts cannot be material entities outside the mind, might they be material entities located inside the human mind? This notion is popular with neuroscientists, who think that concepts are just the product of neural activity in the brain. The problem is that thoughts having meaning and content, whereas perceptions do not. If the neurons in a human brain were the same as concepts, that means the concepts could not be universal. Besides, to reduce concepts to a “product of neurons” obscures the fact that neuron, too, is an abstract concept. That would make for a pernicious vicious circle: the very idea that concepts are nothing but neurons firing is itself nothing but neurons firing. Those who claim that concepts are merely products of neurons should realize that talking about neurons requires the nonmaterial concept of neuron to begin with. In other words, concepts do not come from neuronal activities; instead, we can understand neuronal activities and talk about them only with the help of certain concepts - in this case, the concepts of nerve, neuron, synapse, neurotransmitter and the like. [Concepts can’t be neurons because saying that concepts are just neurons uses concepts to state that argument, which is a vicious circle.] If it is true that concepts and propositions don’t come from our thoughts, or from our observations, or from our languages, or from our surroundings, or from our brains with their neurons, when where else could they come from? They must exist somewhere for concepts to be available to each one of us. The answer is that concepts exist in an infinite, eternal, Divine intellect. [This is a proof of God based on universals] Concepts cannot exist only in human intellects because human intellects are contingent. If abstract objects existed only in human intellects, they would have to come into existence and could go out of existence too. In addition, we could not have concepts in common with other human intellects. And more importantly, before humanity emerged, there would and could not have been any abstract concepts if they had to come with human intellects. So the only sort of intellect on which abstract, universal, and timeless concepts and propositions could ultimately depend for their existence would be an intellect that could not possibly have not existed, but exists in an absolutely necessary way - which is a Divine Intellect, the Mind of God, the First Cause. God is a being who understands all actual truths, plus all possible truths, as well as all necessary truths. A proposition is either true or false because God causes the world to be such that this proposition is either true or false. Therefore, propositions are true, because they exist as true thoughts in the Divine Intellect. No wonder that Aquinas, in his Fifth Way, establishes that God has intellect. The existence of a Divine Intellect would also explain why there seems to be a rather perfect “match” between the rationality of our minds and the “rationality” found in the world around us. Somehow the human intellect seems to be able to capture reality the way it really is. One way of summarizing the argument from universals in an abbreviated form goes as follows: 1. All concepts are abstract, universal entities. 2. These concepts cannot be based on contingent intellects. 3. Therefore, they must reside in a necessary Divine Intellect. As the above excerpts indicate, this is an outstanding book of apologetics that is clear, profound and very, very wise.
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